Seminarios JILAEE U Chicago UCEMA

A partir de una inciativa conjunta con The University of Chicago,los seminarios tienen por objeto crear un espacio para presentar y analizar investigaciones experimentales con foco en los pa√≠ses latinoamericanos que ofrezcan nuevas perspectivas en √°reas como la educaci√≥n, la provisi√≥n privada de bienes p√ļblicos, las preferencias sociales y la econom√≠a ambiental.

Las presentaciones est√°n dirigidas al p√ļblico en general y ser√°n impartidos por investigadores y especialistas visitantes.

Fecha Hora Expositor/Institución Título
09/04 15 h Francesco D’Acunto (Boston College)

Seminario JILAEE UChicago UCEMA: Diverse Policy Committees Can Reach Underrepresented Groups

Increasing the diversity of policy committees has climbed to the top of the political agenda around the world, but the economic motivations and effects of diversity in policy committees are still elusive. In this paper, we propose a randomized control trial to test for the effects of making consumers aware of the presence of underrepresented groups in the US Fed's FOMC on the FOMC's ability to manage consumers' expectations and trust. We find that White women and African American men trust the FOMC's effectiveness more and update their unemployment expectations more in line with FOMC forecasts after being made aware of the presence of underrepresented demographic groups in the FOMC. Only African American women---who have no representation in the FOMC---do not react to awareness about (other) minorities on the FOMC. Overrepresented groups, such as White men, do not react negatively. Our findings suggest an economic channel through which, more diverse policy committee increases policy effectiveness: They can manage the expectations and trust of underrepresented consumers more effectively.

El Seminario se dictará en inglés sin traduccción simultánea

Expositor

Francesco D’Acunto: Boston College

Inscripción

30/04 15 h Suanna Oh (Paris School of Economics)

Seminario JILAEE UChicago UCEMA: Does identity ¬óone’s concept of self¬óinfluence economic behavior in the labor market?

I investigate this question in rural India, focusing on the effect of caste identity on labor supply.In a field experiment, casual laborers belonging to different castes choose whether to take up various real job offers. All offers involve working on a default manufacturing task and an additional task. The additional task changes across offers, is performed in private, and differs in its association with specific castes. Workers’ average take-up rate of offers is 23 percentage points lower if offers involve working on tasks that are associated with castes that rank higher than their own. This gap increases to 47 pp if the castes associated with the relevant offers rank lower than workers’ own in the caste hierarchy. Responses to job offers are invariant to whether or not workers’ choices are publicized, suggesting that the role of identity itself¬órather than social image¬óis paramount. Using a supplementary experiment, I show that 43% of workers refuse to spend ten minutes working on tasks associated with other castes, even when offered ten times their daily wage.

This paper’s findings indicate that identity may be an important constraint on labor supply, contributing to misallocation of talent in the economy.

El Seminario se dictará en inglés sin traduccción simultánea

Expositor

Suanna Oh:Paris School of Economics

Inscripción

07/05 15 h Rachid Laajaj (Universidad de los Andes)

Seminario JILAEE UChicago UCEMA: Equality of Opportunity and Human Capital Accumulation: Motivational Effect of a Nationwide Scholarship in Colombia.

We study the ex ante motivational effect of a nationwide merit and need-based scholarship in Colombia, which granted full scholarships to low-income students at high-quality universities. The results from a difference in regression discontinuity design indicate that the opportunity to receive the scholarship significantly increased test scores at the national high school exit exam at the top of the distribution. At the 90th percentile of the distribution, eligibility for the scholarship reduced the socioeconomic achievement gap by 16 percent. In addition, we find that the eligibility to the scholarship resulted in positive effects on test scores of younger cohorts and increased post-secondary enrollment, even for the non-recipients of the scholarship. Our results highlight how opportunities for social mobility encourage human capital accumulation by low-income students, thus contributing to break the persistence of poverty and inequality.

El Seminario se dictará en inglés sin traduccción simultánea

Expositor

Rachid Laajaj:Associate Professor of Economics, Universidad de los Andes (Colombia).

Inscripción

14/05 15 h Catalina Franco (Norwegian School of Economics )

Seminario JILAEE UChicago UCEMA: Strategic decisions have “major” consequences: Gender differences in college major choices .

We show that gender gaps in college major choices are not solely determined by unconstrained preferences but that they can be magnified by students’ strategies when selecting college major slots. In our setting, university applicants take a college entrance exam for admission to the largest public university in Colombia, which allocates a limited number of college major slots to top performers in the college entrance exam. Using a regression discontinuity design and rich administrative data on applicants’ scores, rankings of majors and enrollments, we study how male and female applicants react when they just miss the cutoff to enroll in their most preferred major. Despite no initial gender differences in stated preference rankings of majors, women who just miss the cutoff for their preferred major are more likely to (1) diversify their options, by submitting a longer list of less preferred majors, and (2) enroll in a less preferred major in the first admission cycle in our data relative to men just below the cutoff, who are more likely to retake the exam. These differential strategies by gender have potentially long-lasting impacts for the labor market. Based on the college majors that applicants just below the cutoff will enroll in, females ultimately have a 7% earnings potential disadvantage compared to males. Our back of the envelope calculation suggests that the gendered reaction to just missing the cutoff for their most preferred major could explain about half of the gender-earnings gap among college-educated workers in Colombia.

El Seminario se dictará en inglés sin traduccción simultánea

Expositor

Catalina Franco:Norwegian School of Economics (NHH). Postdoctoral fellow

Inscripción